Keynotes

confirmed

The North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study: NAPLS 1, 2 and 3

Abstract: The North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) consortium was initiated in 2003 with eight independently National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) funded sites. Sites included the Universities of Yale, Calgary, North Carolina, Emory, Harvard, and the University of California at San Diego and at Los Angeles. In 2008, they were awarded a 5-year grant from NIMH to incorporate biological assessment approaches (neuroimaging, electrophysiological, hormonal and genetic) into a multi-site prospective study of 720 participants at clinical high risk for developing psychosis and 240 matched controls, known as NAPLS 2. Then in 2014 NAPLS was competitively renewed for a new 5-year study period (NAPLS 3) to further clarify the roles of neuroinflammation and deficient synaptic plasticity in the development of psychosis and a 9th site, the University of California, San Francisco was added. Numerous papers have been published from the NAPLS project, an overview of which will be the focus of this presentation.

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canada

Jean Addington

University of Calgary – Canada

TBA

Abstract: TBA.

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uk

Ricardo Araya

King’s College London – UK

Early intervention for bullying victimization

Abstract: Many people have childhood memories of being pushed around and being punched by other pupils when they felt they couldn’t respond. They may also remember being the topic of nasty rumours or being excluded by others. Unfortunately, being bullied is not an unusual experience even in the modern day. This presentation will emphasize 3 main points: 1) genetically-sensitive data are key to providing strong evidence that bullying victimization has an effect on mental health problems, and are not all due to genetic confounds; 2) longitudinal studies are crucial to test whether bullying victimization has an impact on mental health problems – and not just the other way around; 3) bullying victimization can be considered as targets for interventions aiming at both reducing risk factors associated with poor mental health and building the resources necessary to help face life’s challenges.

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uk

Louise Arseneault

King’s College London – UK

Improving the long-term outcome of psychotic disorders through early intervention strategies

Abstract: Early intervention approaches attempt to improve the outcome of psychotic disorder through (1) improving the outcome of the initial critical period and (2) reducing the duration of untreated psychosis. These approaches have been adopted in many programmes around the world, providing specific services for patients presenting for the first time with a psychotic disorder. The actual programme design, resources and outcome vary in different programmes. This presentation focus on data from Hong Kong, a setting with a medium level of mental health resources. Longitudinal outcome data suggest that early intervention is effective in improving the long-term outcome of psychotic disorders. Besides, strategies for relapse prevention may also critically impact on the long-term outcome.

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hongkong

Eric Chen

University of Hong Kong – Hong Kong

Preventing the onset of depressive disorders: Opportunities and challenges

Abstract: Depression is common, costly, has a strong impact on the lives of individuals and society and has a strong association with morbidity and mortality. Preventing the onset of depressive disorders is one of the main challenges for public health in the coming decades. In this presentation an overview of the research field will be given. Why prevention is important, whether preventive interventions are effective, examples of important trials in the field will be given, and possibilities to increase the impact on public health will be discussed.

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netherlands

Pim Cuijpers

University of Amsterdam – Netherlands

Intergenerational Psychiatry: A New Look at a Powerful Perspective

Abstract: The talk will start by discussing recent developments in our understanding of intergenerational processes in psychiatry, from animal studies to converging evidence among humans, expanded by new tools now available, such as neonatal brain imaging, and others (Duarte, Monk, Weissman & Posner, World Psychiatry, accepted). Specific mechanisms and the potential of an intergenerational approach for broadening our understanding of developmental processes in Psychiatry will be illustrated by ongoing studies of individuals growing up in disadvantaged contexts, particularly, the Boricua Youth Study and the Brazil Babies Study.

christianeduarte
usa

Cristiane S. Duarte

Columbia University – USA

TBA

Abstract: TBA.

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germany

Nikolaos Koutsouleris

Ludwig-Maximilian-University – Germany

Early Intervention: The Next Stage

Abstract: TBA

pat
australia

Patrick McGorry

University of Melbourne

Prevention and Early Intervention in Low and Middle-Income Countries: from Neuroscience to Public Health

Abstract: In this presentation, I will discuss strategies for health prevention, promotion, and treatment in low and middle-income countries. I will discuss original data on strategies from neuroscience and pragmatic implementation strategies in low resource settings.

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brazil

Giovanni Salum

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul – Brazil

The North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study: NAPLS 1, 2 and 3

canada

Jean Addington

University of Calgary – Canada

Jean Addington, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada where she holds the Novartis Chair for Schizophrenia Research. Her research interests are in early detection and intervention in psychosis. Currently her major research focus is the examination of predictors of conversion to psychosis and the development of psychosocial interventions for those at clinical high risk of developing psychosis. She is one of the principal investigators in the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) and holds an NIMH grant to determine predictors and mechanisms of developing psychosis. She leads an NIMH funded RCT of Cognitive Behavioral Social Skills Training for clinical high risk. Additionally, she has received funding from Brain Canada to examine predictors of serious mental illness in youth at risk.
uk

Ricardo Araya

King’s College London – UK

Prof Ricardo Araya is Professor of Global Mental Health and the academic lead of the Global Mental Health Research Group, in the Health Service and Population Research Department at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London. He is also director of the Centre for Global Mental Health, a research and education collaboration between the LSHTM and IoPPN which he has helped foster from the start and in 2019 is celebrating 10 years. Ricardo’s field of expertise is in the development and implementation of simple and affordable interventions to treat mental disorders, particularly in resource-poor settings. He has previously developed a model of care to treat depression and anxiety in Chile, which has been adapted and used in several middle and low-income countries. Ricardo plays a leading role in some major initiatives to increase mental research capacity in Latin America and holds strong collaborative links with a wide range of research partners in Africa.

Early intervention for bullying victimization

uk

Louise Arseneault

King’s College London – UK

Louise Arseneault’s research focuses on the study of harmful behaviours such as violence and substance dependence, their developmental origins, their inter-connections with mental health, and their consequences for victims. She is taking a developmental approach to investigate how the consequences of violence begin in childhood and persist to mild-life, by studying bullying victimisation and child maltreatment. Louise also studies the impact of social relationships including social support and loneliness on mental health. Her research aims are to answer questions relevant to psychology and psychiatry by harnessing and combining three different research approaches: developmental research, epidemiological methods and genetically-sensitive designs. Louise’s work incorporates social as well as biological measurements across the life span. Louise completed her PhD in biomedical sciences at the University of Montreal and moved to the UK for a post-doctoral training at the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre. She has been working with well-known longitudinal cohorts such as the Montreal Longitudinal Cohorts, the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study and the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally-representative sample of families with twins in England and Wales. She has also been exploring another important nationally-representative cohort, the National Child Development Survey (NCDS). Louise Arseneault was elected as Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in May 2018.

Improving the long-term outcome of psychotic disorders through early intervention strategies

hongkong

Eric Chen

University of Hong Kong – Hong Kong

Eric Chen is Chi-Li Pao Foundation Chair Professor and Head in the Department of Psychiatry at The University of Hong Kong. He has been leading one of the first early psychosis intervention program in Asia (the EASY program). Eric and his team have been conducting long-term studies for early intervention as well as randomized control studies for relapse prevention, psychological and exercise intervention. They have been able to show that EASY had improved the long-term outcome for psychotic disorders in Hong Kong. They have also been studying psychopathology, brain cognitive and language processes in psychosis. More recently, they are focusing on preventative programs for specific high-risk populations, such as disadvantaged women and youth. Eric was a recipient of the Richard Wyatt Award from the International Early Psychosis Association (IEPA). Eric had served as Vice-President of the International Early Psychosis Association and the Foundation Chairman of the Asian Network for Early Psychosis (ANEP). EC has also served as a board member in the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS). EC was Visiting Professor at the Harvard Medical School, and the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.

Preventing the onset of depressive disorders: Opportunities and challenges

netherlands

Pim Cuijpers

University of Amsterdam – Netherlands

Pim Cuijpers is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (The Netherlands), and Head of the Department of Clinical, Neuro and Developmental Psychology. Pim Cuijpers is specialised in conducting randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses on prevention and psychological treatments of common mental disorders. Much of his work is aimed at prevention of mental disorders, psychological treatments of depression and anxiety disorders, and Internet-delivered treatments. Pim Cuijpers has published more than 850 peer-reviewed papers, chapters, reports and professional publications, including more than 600 papers in international peer-reviewed scientific journals (150 as first author). He is on the Thomson-Reuter Web of Science lists of the ‘highly cited researchers’ since the first edition of this list in 2014 (http://highlycited.com/). According to Expertscape, an organisation that ranks researchers by their expertise in biomedial topics, professor Cuijpers is the world’s number one top expert on depression (http://expertscape.com/ex/depression).

Intergenerational Psychiatry: A New Look at a Powerful Perspective

usa

Cristiane S. Duarte

Columbia University – USA

Lambert Professor at Columbia University – New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI); Co-Director, New York Presbyterian Washington Heights Youth Anxiety Center Clinic. Dr. Duarte is an expert in the development of mental disorders in children, adolescents and young adults. Her research seeks to generate population-based knowledge of relevance to diverse, often underserved and understudied groups. For the past 10 years, she has been leading the Boricua Youth Study, the only source of information about how mental disorders develop over the course of almost 20 years, from childhood to young adulthood, and, more recently, across generations in a Latino subgroup (Puerto Ricans). With a focus on investigating the role of intergenerational processes in the development of psychiatric disorders, Dr. Duarte aims to inform new prevention strategies targeted to break the cycle of disadvantage among vulnerable children. Leading the Youth Anxiety Center Clinic in Washington Heights, Dr. Duarte facilitates bringing state of the art knowledge about effective interventions to underserved youth in a predominantly Latino neighbourhood in the USA. She is also part of collaborations focused on global mental health aiming to improve child mental health services and implement interventions in low-resource settings. Dr. Duarte’s work has been supported by the US National Institute of Health, private donors and foundations.
germany

Nikolaos Koutsouleris

Ludwig-Maximilian-University – Germany

Prof Nikolaos Koutsouleris is the Coordinator of the EU-FP7 funded project PRONIA (“Per-sonalised Prognostic Tools for Early Psychosis Management”; www.pronia.eu). He serves as consultant and Head of the Centre for Adolecence Psychiatry and the Section for Neurodiag-nostic Applications in Psychiatry at the Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich (LMU). Dr. Koutsouleris studied medicine at LMU between 1996 and 2003 as scholar of the German National Academic Foundation. He took his first medical & academ-ic appointment in 2004 at the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, where he finished his doctorate thesis in 2005. Since 2008, Prof Koutsouleris has advanced the use of multivari-ate pattern recognition methods for the identification and validation of diagnostic and prognos-tic prediction models in at-risk and early stages of affective and non-affective psychoses. His work was awarded with several national and international prizes and led so far to over 80 peer-reviewed, highly cited papers. In addition, he strived to make robust machine-learning methods available to researchers in the clinical neurosciences in order to improve the meth-odological rigour of this new research direction based on the proper use of validation and model sharing approaches. These efforts have the lead to the publication of the open-source NeuroMiner machine learning platform available at www.pronia.eu/neurominer.

Early Intervention: The Next Stage

australia

Professor Patrick McGorry

University of Melbourne

Professor Patrick D. McGorry AO, MBBS, MD, PhD, FRCP, FRANZCP, FAA, FASSA, FAHMS is Executive Director of Orygen and Professor of Youth Mental Health at the Centre for Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne. He is also a Founding Director of the National Youth Mental Health Foundation (headspace). Professor McGorry is a world-leading researcher in the area of early psychosis and youth mental health and his innovative research has played an integral role in the development of safe, effective treatments for young people with emerging mental disorders, notably the psychotic and severe mood disorders.

Professor McGorry has published over 800 refereed journal articles and book chapters and has edited nine books. He serves as Editor-in-Chief of Early Intervention in Psychiatry. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, and the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Science. He is current President of the International Association of Youth Mental Health and past President of the Society for Mental Health Research (2013-2017) and the Schizophrenia International Research Society (2016-2018). He has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Society of Biological Psychiatry Humanitarian Award in 2019, the NHMRC Research Excellence Award in 2019, the Schizophrenia International Research Society Lifetime Achievement Award in 2018, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation Lieber Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Schizophrenia Research in 2015, the NAMI Scientific Research Award in 2013, and Australian of the Year in 2010.

Prevention and Early Intervention in Low and Middle-Income Countries: from Neuroscience to Public Health

brazil

Giovanni Salum

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul – Brazil

Giovanni Abrahão Salum is an associate professor at the Department of Psychiatry of Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. He has experience in large scale studies integrating psychiatry, cognition, genetics and neuroscience using an epidemiological perspective. He authored or co-authored more than 130 scientific publications. His work has been focused on using information from genes, environments and neuroscience to understand mental disorders in children and adolescents.